History of the Bryans Works

Complete listing of Bryans machines

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Bryans  3-Ball  Allwins

In 1961 Bryans invented his 3-ball mechanism, which was used in three similar games:  The 3-Ball Seven Win, the 3-Ball Nine Cup, and the 3-Ball Forks.

These machines had a winding handle to operate the mechanism, instead of the usual payout knob.  The player was provided with 3 balls which he would shoot around the playfield in the usual manner.  The machine would pay out 2 coins for each winning ball (although this could be varied).  If all three balls were winners, the player would also win the contents of the jackpot in the centre of the playfield.

The Forks was slightly more sophisticated, as it was provided with a ball catching feature.  The three winning holes were covered by three chrome 'forks' which could be swung to and fro by the player, in an attempt to catch the ball as it fell.  These were controlled by the knob seen halfway up the cabinet on the left-hand side.

The 3-Ball Allwins were available in a number of different case styles.

 

Bryans 3-Ball Allwins

3-BALL NINE CUP (1961)
in streamline case

3-BALL SEVEN WIN (1961)
(photo courtesy D.Lavender)

3-BALL FORKS (1961)

Close-up detail of 7-Win
(photo courtesy S.Parkes)

Close-up detail of Forks

See also 3-Ball Forks

View showing the complex mechanism of the 3-Ball Allwins.  This one is from the Forks.

Part of Bryan's patent specification for the Forks.

A particularly interesting feature of these machines is the method by which Bryan fed the three balls in turn to the trigger mechanism.  Instead of having a complicated feeding mechanism to release one ball at a time from the machine; Bryan released all the balls at the start of play, but arranged for them to fall below the level of the hammer.  As the hammer is pulled back by the player, a simple 'L' shaped lever lifts up each ball in turn and deposits it on a ledge at the firing position.  A delightfully simple solution to avoid the need for a complex internal feeding mechanism, and a typical example of Bryan's ingenuity.

Values: £1200-1800 (The Forks is more common)

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This web site is copyright (C) 1999-2016 Melvyn Wright
A note about values: These were included on the site because 80% of emails received by me are of the type "I have xyz machine - how much is it worth?". The values are based on the best information available at the time, but they are subject to large fluctuations due to the condition of the machine, the case style, and the demand for it at the time of sale.  There is no guarantee that your particular machine is worth the amount shown on this site.  All values are in GBP (£).