Digital Manometer

by Melvyn Wright

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Digital Manometer
It is generally very difficult to measure low wind pressures of the type involved in organ building.  We normally work on pressures well under 10" of water.  1" of water pressure is equal to just 0.036 PSI.  So even 10 inches of water pressure is only about one third of 1 PSI!

We normally use a home-made water manometer (as shown in the John Smith plans) to measure these very low pressures. These are all very well, but they are messy, cumbersome, inconvenient, and not very portable.

But I recently found this device on Amazon, and just bought one:

It's a digital manometer and it has 11 units, including psi, mbar, inches of water, inches of mercury, etc. The spec says that it can measure pressures up to 55" of water, which is much too high for our purposes, and I wondered whether it would work with pressures down to 1". But as it gives a digital readout it should do. So I bought one to try it out.

The answer is YES you can easily measure pressures down to 1", in 0.1" increments. I've tested this by gently blowing down the tube.

It can measure absolute pressure and the differential pressure between two points (so you can check for leaks, or for wind channels that are are too small). It has a Hold facillty and a Recording facility, and other features which aren't needed! It can measure vacuums as well.

So, all-in-all, this is something which will turn out to be very useful, and much more convenient than fiddling about with plastic tubes full of water - And it also works upside-down!

At £22 (current price) it's quite cheap, and you get a selection of plastic tubes with it and a carry bag.

Here is the link to the UK Amazon site, but I'm sure it is available in other countries (and from other sellers):

Buy from Amazon UK

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